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Eunsoo Ahn

born: 1989
born in: Seoul
I am a very serious person. I make art and I also study economics. I don't talk I only communicate.

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EE says:
“hey ”
Posted over 3 years ago
“Hi Eunsoo! Thanks for the comment! And I think it is a exciting discussion also! I agree with you when you say that art is a necessary activity and it is also a natural activity, after all it comes from us, like all other mental and creative and mysterious activity (I had some thoughts along these line on my blog here). It seems that at one point the 'necessary' was equated with 'basic' (or biological) need (sleeping or eating for example). Now the urge (or instinct) to create can be sometimes so strong that it becomes 'basic' need: had it ever happen to you to forget to eat (or try not to sleep) just you wanted to create and finish something soooo badly??”
Posted over 4 years ago
“Art market downturn sharper? Can you trust Christie's? http://www.reuters.com/article/GlobalLuxury09/idUSTRE55751120090608”
Posted over 4 years ago
“La Biennale di Venezia is on! http://www.labiennale.org/en/Home.html”
Posted over 4 years ago
“LuminaTO kicks off today! Celebrate creativity and arts here: www.luminato.com I will be reporting.”
Posted over 4 years ago
“Art market is adjusting to recession, Jeff Koons sold for lower than low estimate, etc: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/13/arts/design/13auction.html?ref=nyregion”
Posted over 4 years ago
“I can't believe I wasn't here 2 years ago Time to travel back into time http://www.artspeak.ca/exhibitions/event_detail.html?event_id=183 ”
Posted over 4 years ago
“Latest great thing that cannot be stopped thinking of: Giraud and Siboni's L'attraction. It's Malevich+science fiction”
Posted over 4 years ago
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Installation
Social Networking

Picture:Sarah Lazoravic, Older


At the Luminato Box, on tuesday, Sarah Lazarovic exhibited paintings of Twitter selections, with little printouts of the people's profile pics right by them. It was painted by the man who does signs for Honest Eds, Toronto's famous quirky bargain store! Interesting touch! Honest Ed's and Twitter! What would that look like? well it looks like the picture above.The written canvases featured lines such as:


"Unwrapping little chocolate eggs and eating them sadly"


"I am wondering what happened to the Ossington strip club"


"and it killed me"


"If you are still sleeping it's ok. I will eat this muffin for you"


and more! It was witty, it was well-designed, I wouldn't mind having one on my wall. Fun show! Simple and relatable.


Lot of people do art based on the social networking nowadays, since it is such an vital, yet mysterious part of our daily lives. I mean what is really the point of putting "I just woke up" or "going to the store" on internet and sharing with everyone? Are people THAT desparate to stay in touch 24/7? What's more interesting is how we make art about it...I guess it's equivalent to futurists making art about automobiles and new technologies. But futurist's manifesto was clear: they wildly celebrated the new techonology as a saviour. What's the our stance? Where are we going with this? oh and imagine instead of writing on internet, everyone carries big boards and writes down their "status" and just carry it around....which is kind of what twitter does except that would be in real life. Or, what if you make these paintings gigantic?


Video: Tony Oursler's installations were by OCAD and AGO. It was, um, very conceptual. Basically a room with tvs and other clutters, in the middle of the street. The idea of crossover between public and private has a lot of interesting potential, so couldn't help feeling that this could've been better. The video and audio that was playing seemed to be very out of touch with the viewer, leaving them simply confused with random images and incoherent sayings. The clutter was interesting, but there was a lack of engagement with the public. Is it because it is conceptual art, which is detached from the public as it already is, as an installation in a public place? maybe. The glass was very separating between the viewer and the piece itself. especially with the reflections on the glass that obstructed view. What if you could go inside of the room and become a part of it instead of just looking at it from outside, so you can be a part of a conceptual piece, even if you don't know much about art. And what if there was an actual person in there instead of video showing? Like sleeping in the clutter or something. Or just without the glass walls, clutter of a room presented just in the middle of the street. That could've been more engaging with the public and could still keep the concepts. But still, it was interesting to see a conceptual, experimental installation in a public place, because that hardly gets done. Something to think about!

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Artists

Andy Warhol
Yayoi Kusama
Jeff Koons

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Economics
Auctions
Recession

Painting: Giorgio De Chirico


Being an economics student and enthusiast, I am always interested in the art market, and trying to analyze what's going on. And you should be too, because market's always fun to watch, especially at times like these where everyone's fired, no one is hired, and the companies are declaring bankrupcies.


Here are some things that are going on:


Art dealer Gagosian is having a shopping spree, especially prior to Gagosian Gallery's new shows. Him buying Koons's  “Baroque Egg With Bow (Turquoise/Magenta)”,  at the sotheby's auction in may is probably an attempt to keep the prices and demands up before Koons' new show, "Popeye Series". running from coming July 2 to September 13. The Gagosian gallery is also running superstar shows such as CY Twombly and Yayoi Kusama, which will likely bring in good sales even in times like these. The dealers are trying to keep the market afloat by exhibitions and purchases. Oh also Gagosian is involved in the restaurant with Ron Perelman, the art-buying investor billionaire is trying to open up at the Hamptons. That's randomly funny but I don't know why it is...but I do know that I want to go to that restaurant.


This is a biggest slump in the art market since 1991, but the auction market is improving. Average sales rate went to 74% of the lots offered from 64% of last november. And if the confidence keeps on increasing, who knows what will happen later... The buyers are investing in classics, because that's the risk-less material with the brand value that will increase in value later for sure. Calder, Hockney, Lichtenstein, Koons, etc. 


At Art Basel this year, prices are being slashed even for the big name artists. If I was rich and buy art instead of making them myself, I would totally buy right now as future investments. Although I don't get attached to materials, I realized having nice things have its benefit, like being able to sell them when I need money. I mean an Andy Warhol which would've have sold for 1 million last year, is $675,000 now. It's the bargain time. But since it's a global crisis, who will take advantage of the deals? 100 richest people in Russia lost 73% of their wealth, and house prices in Dubai fell 32% from last year!


But the confidence is improving, and time will tell if it will get better or not....you never know what will happen with markets.


What exciting time we live in! and what an interesting time to do art! If the prices go so low and fall to under $10, I will buy all the classics such as Warhols, Da Vincis, Picassos and make a collage out of them and that will be my new art project.


Watch the good ol' times at the auction: when Monet broke record last may.


 

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“pretty exciting stuff huh? yeah maybe a whole new movement and a new generation of artists will emerge as a result of this market meltdown. What's next? and it's also an opportunity about real value and quality of art, just like the article from the link below mentions!”
Posted over 4 years ago
Unknown User says:
“Yes now is a great time to buy. This is a similar time to that of the burst in the 80's which was followed by new art movements in the 90's like the YBA's and the Relational Aesthetics artists. I wonder what art will look like when the market recovers this time round???”
Posted over 4 years ago
“Check out this article: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/15/arts/design/15cott.html?_r=1&scp=3&sq=arT%20BOOM&st=cse Its called The Boom Is Over. Long Live The Art.”
Posted over 4 years ago
Unknown User says:
“Thanks for the info, I really like this sorrta stuff and never knew where to look ,keep keeping us informed”
Posted over 4 years ago
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Red Ball Project
Luminato
Toronto



Third day of LuminaTO!


Picture: RED BALL PROJECT was at Old city hall! It looked so great with the old historical architecture. A new way to look at Old city hall as well as the red ball. There are some projects in LuminaTO that uses the environment incredibly well, like the sine wave at the Brookfield place. Impressive!


Red ball project started in 2001, and has travelled the world through cities such as Barcelona and Chicago. You just put...a giant red ball in random places in a city!


The artist was also present for a while at the site. As I asked where he got the idea, he replied something along the lines of: "I was commissioned a public installation, and thought of this".  So it was an empty answer where he didn't really say anything. Hmmmm. interesting. But when asked "what does it mean" by a passer-by, he replied that it's about looking at the city, and playing with the city so maybe that's what he means?


Anyways, everyone had such a blast with it. People ran into it, hugged it, talked about it, everyone took a picture with it.... It was such a fun installation for everyone no matter how old you are, which was amazing, because art exhibits are easy to be an impersonal experience where it's just very quiet and lots of staring for the public. Community-family-public-fun-time, which is art! Refreshing!


It will be in the city for the rest of the festival: check out the info and the scheduled locations HERE


Follow the red ball! Around the city! around the world(if you can afford)!


 


What was disappointing:


1.Binary Waves are still not installed, due to electrical problems. Official statement has not been released yet about when it will be ready.


2.Raphael Mazzucco's exhibition looked like a Lo'Real and Lancome Booth, not an art exhibit. So did the film that was being projected in the gallery, which was laced with pictures of makeup being put on models.


What was good:


 the visual art exhibitions are really showing how much of amazing space for art there is in Toronto, and how it can be used creatively. Burroughs Building, Old City Hall, Brookfield Place.....Especially the financial district, it's like that district was designed for exhibitions. It's just a matter of how you would bring the public flow there.


Here's a video of red ball! on Tuesday it's at First Canadian Place. Go play!


 

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LuminaTO, Toronto's celebration of culture and creativity, kicked off yesterday. Visual art gets a great chance to show what it has in store for the city. This year's theme: Communication.


Here is what was interesting on day 1:


The picture above is David Rokeby's "Long Wave", at Brookfield Place. This is a representation of a sine wave, which is a general wave pattern of handheld communication devices. This was great. The installation used the interior architecture of the place very well, the white grid of of the roofs and walls provides a natural resemblance to graphing papers, which goes perfectly with the red sine wave. Great architecture always benefits things in the long run, providing space for potential. Hooray to Calatrava! As well as Rokeby! This installation also provides a different look from every point of view, being a multidimensional as well as single dimensionality of a graph. It's like you are in a 3D sine graph! Really happy I could see this one! Rokeby is an artist to watch.


The video is Germaine Koh's "Broken Arrow" at The Exchange Tower. Interesting concept, but I have to say the way it was exhibited was very lacking. The projection on the wall is based on the communication devices around the projector. The box, which projects, has a detector that senses the signals and devices around it. So it captures it, and projects the device information on the wall. Technologically this has much potential for great exhibition, but it was sort of hidden in the inside of the Exchange Tower, where there is very little public flow. I mean, who goes there other than people who work there??? Come on! Also the scale of the exhibition was very small. What if it was in a bigger public space where there is a constant flow of people, like the Eaton Centre or City Hall, or middle of the busy street? And projection could be not centered into a little circle, but all over the ceiling or on a face of building in much bigger size? That could have looked amazing at night! But although the curating was disappointing, the technology here definately have a potential for application.


What was disappointing:


1.As I came to the site for the Binary Waves, an interactive piece by LAb[au], at the supposed time it was to be showing, it was still being prepared! Not ready at all! Tsk tsk!


2.Big L'Oreal booth at Yonge and Dundas, filled with makeup booths. I mean I know it is corporate-sponsered, but you don't have to shove it in the public's face. It just doesn't look very good. It seems like it is L'Oreal festival rather than for creativity and arts.


Overall it could've been better, but it is only day 1! Can't wait to see what else is coming up!


 

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Jen *Rose says:
“I agree with you about the make-up booths! Not subtle at all. ”
Posted over 4 years ago
Eunsoo Ahn replies:
“YES! also did you visit Raphael Mazzuco's exhibition? I mean that was just Lo'real Exhibition. Too much!”
Posted over 4 years ago
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posted on 06.04.09

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Introduction
Ilya Repin
Russia

Hello Everybody! This is Eunsoo,


Nice to meet you all, and I will be showing you what's interesting in today's art world! BE INTERESTED. You should care! And I'm funny too so it will be educational as well as entertainment. This is not your typical art blog filled with following words: metaphor, aesthetics, post modern, post-post-modern, post-post-post modern, etc.


First of all, here's some things about myself so you can get to know who's talking:


1. I study economics and make art too. I analyze art in art point of view as well as economic point of view. Prepare to hear phrases like "Market value of Rothko is dropping....." or "The new Koons, is it investment worthy?" People out there who are shocked with repulsion, Come On. Everything is economy, everything is business.


2. I am not pretentious. Surprise! I plan to deliever art with 0% pretention. Impossible you say? Let's see.


3. I want to move to Amsterdam.


I promise to give you:


1. Underrated, idea-based, fantastic art


2. Real information, not fleeting pretention of ego.


 


Well there you go! To depart, I leave you with this haunting painting "Ivan the Terrible" by Ilya Repin, an amazing Russian painter at the turn of the century, 19th that is. There are such few people who can produce this powerful work. Those Russians can do art.


 


 


 


 


 


 

“What a pleasure to read your introduction, Eunsoo. I am looking forward to more. The painting is extraordinary.”
Posted over 4 years ago
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