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JuanMapu

born: 1977
born in: Pereira, Colombia
lives in: New York City
JuanMapu is the major contributor of www.juanmapu.info and the author of "Mango Preacher: Textos derivados de un blog", a collection of short stories inspired while developing his blog. He is also known for sexy late night DJ sets and co-hosting the... [more]

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DF en Inglés (México City in English)

DF en inglés Three years wondering how did I finish in here. It is about silence. Tlatelolco cannot be that quiet all the time. It must have another voice sound noise, different to the Singer machine and the cars outside. This is like three years of hiding. “I think you have done well in here. You are a succesful model, something you never expected. You paid your debts in the States working from here.” True. I am living the opposite equation of the border. I’m selling my body to make my living. She discovered me in a store. “Can you try these clothes for me, I’ll give you money.” She did. Then we had dinner and made love. We now live in her mother’s apartment, without her of course. She is not around here anymore, just in the pictures she kept next to the candles. I do like this place, it is big and I don’t pay anything. Moreover, I found myself as an actor too. I am probably the only show in the Plaza de las Tres culturas. I am the man, the woman, I am the everything non-genre creature. “You gotta take me to the States soon. I have a new collection and I know people will die with my clothes.” How did I finished earning more money than her? I don’t know. I used to see myself as talentless man, but lucky enough to get laid. She wants to go to the States. Me too. But I don’t want to do it for the money. I want to do my show there. I want to be close to the lake, under the avenues in Chicago’s downtown. In a park during the summer. I know people will like my body. There are only two countries in the world where my belly can be successful, and I am so lucky I was born in one of them and the other is the neighbor country. Born in the States, born again in Mexico, born in Mexico, born again in the US. My epitaph. Accurate. “These are gabachos colors, check it out." “We should try New York too. I know places and people.” She can make it. I know that. I do it here, she does it there. Easy. “How you ever think for how long can we stay there?” She has asked that since I met her. She knows we are going. Soon. Every time she lights the candles, she knows we are going.
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Artists

Louie Vega

Categories

Music
Electronica
Techno/House/Big Beat

Themes

Playful
Rhythmic

Tags

House Music
Deep House

A good underground house DJ from Chicago, visiting New York City, told me in a party, "Don't stick to New York DJs, listen to everyone." I agreed with him besides that I am a New York DJs devotee. After meditating on the memories of the best parties I've been and checking my records all over again, I came with this list of DJ/producers that I consider "a must listen-see-dance". They are all from United States, and four are from New York City, I couldn't help it. 


Theo Parrish - Detroit, Michigan


"The Detroit-based DJ and producer might be known for his deeper-than-deep house records, but don’t expect him to spin purist DJ sets – Parrish is just as likely to play vintage disco or soul ballads as anything house-related." -- www.residentadvisor.net


Louie Vega - Bronx, New York 


"Vega helped pioneer Latin-infused dance grooves and is beloved for his studio collaborations with clubland outsiders such as Tito Puente and George Benson. He is considered the godfather of house music. By tapping his salsero heritage and dusting off unsung, orchestral disco, Vega made club sounds legit." -- www.lacitybeat.com


Kenny Dope - Brooklyn, New York


"Dope's history is synonymous with New York City's vast and rich heritage of dance music and melting pot vibes that hardly any other place on the planet can offer. From raw block party vibes to the baby powder utopia of clubs like Shelter or Body & Soul - you can be sure to come across a Dope beat sooner or later." -- Red Bull Music Academy 


Karizma - Baltimore, Maryland


Self diagnosed as “a.d.d. with music,” Chris “Karizma” Clayton has always aspired to be a producer who “keeps changing and moving on to different things for the challenge.” This is not always the easiest way to make a name for yourself in a music scene that praises a “signature sound.” -- www.xlr8r.com 


Danny Krivit - New York, New York


"How does a DJ survive nearly four decades of work without becoming completely jaded? How does he maintain his passion while navigating the pitfalls of an often-fickle clubland? How does he make a living while remaining artistically viable and true to his craft? It’s a unique set of questions and one rarely asked because there are very few DJs in a position to answer. One of them is Danny Krivit, a man whose vast experience includes 35 years in the booth, an accumulation of 70,000 records and almost as many useful anecdotes." -- Jim Tremayne, DJ Times Magazine 


Osunlade - St. Louis, Missouri


"Osunlade is not just a House Music phenomenon, but one of the true artists of any genre or artform of our time. A working musician from the age of seventeen, he's released more than twenty albums of material and worked with artists from Patti Labelle to Roy Ayers. In the realm of dance music, you'll find few who are more respected, not just for his abilities to create but his faithfulness to his ideals and his muse." - Shani Hebert, 5 Magazine


Joe Clausell - Brooklyn - New York


"Having been surrounded on all sides by a diverse combination of music from rock, soul, pop, African, and Latin, Joe started to contribute his own musical inspiration at his Friday night jam sessions at the illustrious vinyl shop Dance Tracks. After later becoming part owner, Joe continued to travel the world in search of the spirituality in music as well as continuing to play international venues." -- Deejaybooking.com

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posted on 06.09.09

Artists

Tito Puente
Willie Colón

Categories

Music

Themes

Rhythmic
Intense

Tags

Salsa
Tropical
Latin Music
Nuyorican Culture

Of course there is salsa music in many places, it's just that there is something special about what has come from New York City. They have a punch, the city attitude and a will to go deep into the jam as they carry the latin diaspora experience. Here 8 salseros from –born or raised– New York City:


Williie Colón: "As a trombone player, he shaped the gritty, aggressive sound of the brass that characterized the New York sound." - Robert Leaver (Rhapsody.com)


Ray Barretto: "Barretto is credited for being the first U.S.-born percussionist to integrate the African-based conga drum into jazz. This fact has designated him as on of the early "crossover" artists in jazz -- skillfully balancing his Latin leanings and his love for bebop througout a long and successful career." - Rolando Arrieta (NPR.org)


Richie Ray: "The Brooklyn native went to High School for Performing Arts and Julliard School of Music. He put together the essentials of classical music along with Afrolatin rhythms like guajira, chachachá, boogaloo and son." - (www.prpop.org)


Eddie Palmieri: "Palmieri himself is an incredible piano player, dramatic and percussive, deeply influenced by McCoy Tyner but very much an individual talent. He's had his ups and downs over the years, and his body of work reflects that, but when he's at his best there's nobody better, and he's been at his best very often." - (www.warr.org)


José Mangual Jr.: "It took a long time for someone to come up with a tribute to the late Chano Pozo, veteran conga player.... José Mangual, Jr. does a fantastic job with the help of the top Latin rhythm section in the music business." - Cash Box


Johnny Pacheco: "With his first recording, Pacheco y su Charanga, released by Alegre Records in 1961, Pacheco changed the sound of music throughout Latin America and ushered in the "Pachanga" (a strenous dance) era which faded out in 1964." - Max Salazar, All Music Guide


Joe Cuba: "In contrast to the majority of Latin orchestras of the era, which were larger and relied on trombones and other brass instruments to define their sound, Mr. Cuba’s group went for a cooler approach. A vibraphone and piano often played the main melodic lines, floating atop a strong and assertive rhythm section." - Larry Rohter (www.nytimes.com)


Tito Puente: "Puente was responsible for making timbales a respectable solo instrument in Latin dance music and Latin jazz. He was also an accomplished player of the vibraphone, alto sax, bass, piano and drums, as well as an arranger and band leader." - (www.lpmusic.com)

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Artists

Carlos Mayolo
Andrés Caicedo

Categories

International Film
Fiction
Beats

Themes


Tags

Latin American Cinema
Latin Fiction

Let's start by saying this group is not from California. It is from Colombia, South America. "El Grupo de Cali" was formed by young intellectuals who share a taste for film, rock and salsa music. It could be said that distances itself from the "Magical Realism" of García Márquez  for an urban approach that also describes social conflict and issues around youth identity in the seventies.


The main icon of the group is Andrés Caicedo, a prolific multidisciplinary artist. His early dead made of him a cult figure for young Colombians but also prevented his work to be know in the rest of Latin America. His novel "¡Qué viva la música!" accounts the salsa and rock scene of the early seventies through the voice of woman. The novel carries a fresh slangy beat voice and encourages a honest genuine living.


Along with Caicedo were filmmakers Carlos Mayolo, Luis Ospina and Ramiro Arbelaez, as well as Teatre director and writer Sandro Romero Rey. The film style of the group mix cinema verite, italian neo realism and french wave with drops of fantasy and vampirism. The social critique is constant in their works. 


Members and recommended works:


Andrés Caicedo: "¡Qué viva la música!" (Novel) 1977.


Carlos Mayolo: "Carne de tu carne" (Film) 1983


Luis Ospina: "La desazón suprema: retrato incesante de Fernando Vallejo" (Documentary)  2003


Sandro Romero: Clock Around the Rock (Non Fiction) 2008

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DF en Inglés (México City in English)

DF en Inglés Three years wondering how did I finish in here. It is about silence. Tlatelolco cannot be that quiet all the time. It must have another voice sound noise, different to the Singer machine and the cars outside. This is like three years of hiding. “I think you have done well in here. You are a succesful model, something you never expected. You paid your debts in the States working from here.” True. I am living the opposite equation of the border. I’m selling my body to make my living. She discovered me in a store. “Can you try these clothes for me, I’ll give you money.” She did. Then we had dinner and made love. We now live in her mother’s apartment, without her of course. She is not around here anymore, just in the pictures she kept next to the candles. I do like this place, it is big and I don’t pay anything. Moreover, I found myself as an actor too. I am probably the only show in the Plaza de las Tres culturas. I am the man, the woman, I am the everything non-genre creature. “You gotta take me to the States soon. I have a new collection and I know people will die with my clothes.” How did I finished earning more money than her? I don’t know. I used to see myself as talentless man, but lucky enough to get laid. She wants to go to the States. Me too. But I don’t want to do it for the money. I want to do my show there. I want to be close to the lake, under the avenues in Chicago’s downtown. In a park during the summer. I know people will like my body. There are only two countries in the world where my belly can be successful, and I am so lucky I was born in one of them and the other is the neighbor country. Born in the States, born again in Mexico, born in Mexico, born again in the US. My epitaph. Accurate. “These are gabachos colors, check it out." “We should try New York too. I know places and people.” She can make it. I know that. I do it here, she does it there. Easy. “How you ever think for how long can we stay there?” She has asked that since I met her. She knows we are going. Soon. Every time she lights the candles, she knows we are going.