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posted on 05.28.08

Came across this this morning.

'Artist Erik Nordenankar came up with a brilliant idea: make the worlds largest drawing.

He built a GPS tracker suitcase and sent it, via DHL, around the world. The GPS device recorded its location every few minutes and when the suitcase made it back after 55 days Erik plotted it on a world map. The drawing is 110664 kilometers long and stretches over 6 continents and 62 countries.'

I really like the writing instrument. The tracing, traversing of the everyday routes of transport across the surface of our planet.

On this same day I got a email from my friend Michael Grey, artist and inventor of Zoob. I have to post it here because it so perfect. Perfect to me in the sense of presenting Michael's spatial instrumentation and invention of Zoob, as a language deep inside time and emergence as contrasted to this tracing.

Something in both of them I like in stereo.

Michael,

Yes, it was the creation story and inspirational context for the toy that I was hoping to learn more about. My interest is unusual; I am going to India nex month to teach cosmology to Tibetan monks in Dharamsala, and I'll cover the evolution of the universe and basic physics, and the role of biology too.
It is a challenging assignment since the monks have no great technical background and very different cultural underpinning for their knowledge. I plan on using ZOOB, and on having them use ZOOB, to explore and model structures and experiment with relationships both physical and biological. I am hoping that
the "play" aspect with draw them out, engage them, and allow them to creatively engage the science content that I present.

Regards,

Chris

Michael,

I think ZOOB will be a great tool to create a rich learning environment for the monks in India. I'm putting this together on the fly, but will send out a 500-piece box to use during
my lectures. I plan to use the game to represent connections at at three levels of scale in physics, chemistry and biology.
In physics, it will be the different modes of connection as analogs of atomic and nuclear forces, and the different scales of interaction of fundeamental particles. In chemistry, it is
easy to show bonding and chemical diversity, and at the level of biology, information coding molecules and their relation to morphology in the organism via genes. I think its great that
the games pieces can in each case be used in pure exploratory mode for the monks to discover the "rules" and possible modes
of connection and interaction. Then they can build towards the possibilities enabled by the ground level architecture. Play is of course one of the most powerful learning modes for both
scientists and non-scientists, and I bet the purity of purpose and lifestyle of the Bhuddist practitioners will mean they get a lot out of these activities. But, as I said, for me this is
a bit underplanned and rushed, so I'm hoping it will be chaos that leads to creativity. As you say, emergence is one of the big subplots in this material.

Chris

JAX says:
“I watched this a few months ago on current.com and found it to be a very interesting approach to art 2.0 however, I digress that this "piece" was not at all green friendly!”
Posted over 5 years ago
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